Interesting Words

Reverse Engineering

Reverse engineering is the process of discovering the technological principles of a device through analysis of its structure, function, and operation. It often involves taking apart an electronic component, software program, or other device in order to redesign the system for better maintainability or produce a copy of a system without access to the original design. Militaries often use reverse engineering to copy other nations’ technology.

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Feraliminal Lycanthropizer

The Feraliminal Lycanthropizer is a fictional machine invented by American writer David Woodard, whose 1990 pamphlet of the same title speculates on its history and purpose.

The brief, anonymously published work describes a vibration referred to as thanato-auric waves, which the machine electrically generates by combining three infrasonic sine waves (3 Hz, 9 Hz and 0.56 Hz) with concomitant tape loops of unspecified spoken text (two beyond the threshold of decipherability, and two beneath the threshold).

See also https://www.quora.com/q/weirdwiki/Feraliminal-Lycanthropizer-Wikipedia?__filter__=all&__nsrc__=1&__snid3__=4044130613

read more at Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

“Selling Airplanes”

On Aug. 7, 1955, Boeing’s chief of flight testing, the legendary Alvin “Tex” Johnston, pulled an impressive stunt in the prototype of the Boeing 707.

Johnston didn’t just do a flyover. No. At a speed of 490 miles an hour, Johnston executed a barrel roll.

The stunt, called a Barrel Roll, was performed in front of a crowd of 250,000 spectators attending the Gold Cup hydro races which included many airline executives from around the world (who were in Seattle for an annual meeting) in attendance.

When asked what he thought he thought he was doing Johnston answered, “Selling Airplanes”.

Read More: http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/60-years-ago-the-famous-boeing-707-barrel-roll-over-lake-washington/

www.Boeing.com

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing

 

 

 

onomatopoeia

Onomatopoeia noun is a word which itself sounds like what the word means: Bang, crackle, zip, ha-ha, etc.

https://literarydevices.net/onomatopoeia/

Here is a HUGE list of ONOMATOPOEIC words used in complete sentences. You’ll love these original onomatopoeia examples.

http://www.ereadingworksheets.com/figurative-language/poetic-devices/onomatopoeia-examples/

Synchronicity

A term coined by psychologist Carl Jung to describe what he called “meaningful coincidences,” synchronicity is the experience of two or more causally unrelated events that are conceptually similar and have very little chance of occurring together randomly—such as the discovery of the same idea by two different people at approximately the same time. Although Jung had introduced the concept of synchronicity in the 1920s, he did not fully explain it until when? Discuss
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Disabuse

Disabuse verb Sounds like it has something to with stopping abuse, but really means to persuade someone to a view contrary to their own.

Disabuse means to free someone of a belief that is not true. Many teachers of health find that when they teach, they spend as much energy disabusing kids of false beliefs as they do giving them the facts.

Read more… https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/disabuse

Serendipity

Serendipity – noun – the occurrence and development of events by chance in a happy or beneficial way.

synonyms: chance, happy chance, accident, happy accident, fluke

Defined as the faculty of making fortunate discoveries by accident, the word “serendipity” was first coined in 1754 by English author Horace Walpole in one of his more than 3,000 letters. In it, he explains that the root of his new word is taken from “The Three Princes of Serendip,” a Persian fairytale about princes who “were always making discoveries, by accidents and sagacity, of things which they were not in quest of.” Past serendipitous discoveries include x-rays, helium, and what else? …read more

Paraprosdokian

A paraprosdokian is a figure of speech in which the latter part of a sentence, phrase, or larger discourse is surprising or unexpected in a way that causes the reader or listener to reframe or reinterpret the first part. It is frequently used for humorous or dramatic effect, sometimes producing an anticlimax. Wikipedia

 
 
 

Treacle Mining

Treacle mining is the fictitious mining of treacle (similar to molasses) in a raw form similar to coal. The subject purports to be serious but is an attempt to test credulity. Thick black treacle makes the deception plausible. The topic has been a joke in British humour since the mid-19th century.

Read More at Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treacle_mining

Bezoar – It’s a Medical Term

bezoar photo
Photo by Internet Archive Book Images

A bezoar is a mass found trapped in the gastrointestinal system, though it can occur in other locations.

A pseudobezoar is an indigestible object introduced intentionally into the digestive system.

There are several varieties of bezoar, some of which have inorganic constituents and others organic. The term has both a modern (medical, scientific) and a traditional usage.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bezoar

Bielefeld Conspiracy

The Bielefeld conspiracy (German: Bielefeldverschwörung or Bielefeld-Verschwörungpronounced [ˈbiːləfɛltfɛɐ̯ˌʃvøːʁʊŋ]) is a satire of conspiracy theories that originated in 1993 in the German Usenet, which claims that the city of Bielefeld, Germany, does not exist,[1] but is an illusion propagated by various forces. Originally an internet phenomenon, the conspiracy has since been mentioned in the city’s marketing,[2]and referenced by Chancellor Angela Merkel.[3]

Read More at Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bielefeld_conspiracy

flashover

flashover – n. – the moment a conversation becomes real and alive, which occurs when a spark of trust shorts out the delicate circuits you keep insulated under layers of irony, momentarily grounding the static emotional charge you’ve built up through decades of friction with the world.

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The Oxford Comma

In English language punctuation, a serial comma or series comma (also called Oxford comma and Harvard comma) is a comma placed immediately before the coordinating conjunction (usually and or or) in a series of three or more terms.

Read More: Serial comma (Oxford comma) – Wikipedia

diaporama

diaporama is a photographic slideshow, sometimes with accompanying audio, ranging from using only one or two slide projectors to a multi-image slideshow using a wide screen and several slide projectors connected to a central controlling device changing the slides, turning lamps on and off etc.

bear the brunt

Put up with the worst of some bad circumstance, as in “It was the secretary who had to bear the brunt of the doctor’s anger.”

Explore Dictionary.com


Related Words for ‘bear the brunt’

withstandbraveundergofeeltolerateexperiencefaceweathersustainsufferencounterknowaccustomstomachsticksupportbrookabidecountenancestand

The Palermo Stone

The Palermo stone is the largest known fragment of an ancient Egyptian stele containing the earliest extant historic annals. It was engraved around the 25th century BCE and includes a hieroglyphic listing of the kings of ancient Egypt, the years of their reigns, notations of historic events, and information pertaining to the flooding of the Nile. The stone was so named because it is housed in a museum in Palermo, Italy, but small pieces of it are held in what other cities?
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Adoxography

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Adoxography is a term coined in the late 19th century, and means “fine writing on a trivial or base subject”. It was a form of rhetorical exercise “in which the legitimate methods of the encomium are applied to persons or objects in themselves obviously unworthy of praise, as being trivial, ugly, useless, ridiculous, dangerous or vicious”

Source: Adoxography – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Useful idiot – noun

A useful idiot is a derogatory term for a person perceived as propagandizing for a cause without fully comprehending the cause’s goals, and who is cynically used by the cause’s leaders.

The term was originally used during the Cold War to describe non-communists regarded as susceptible to communist propaganda and manipulation. The term has often been attributed to Vladimir Lenin, but this attribution is unsubstantiated.

Read More: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Useful_idiot

See also: Useful idiot (disambiguation)