Interesting Words

I didn’t get a “harrumph” out of that guy!

Read More - Source: Here's the Old Catch Phrase Daily

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I didn’t get a “harrumph” out of that guy! – The Honorable William J. Lepetomane (Mel Brooks) in Blazing Saddles (1974)

The Governor expected everyone to show agreement with him by giving him a ‘harrumph’. One politician neglected to do so until urged on by Hedley Lamarr.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0071230/quotes/qt0499938

See Also: https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Blazing_Saddles

High-Speed Photography

Read More - Source: Catchphrase Daily's Off Line 'Pending' Posts

This article came to our attention via Catchphrase Daily's Off Line 'Pending' Posts

High-speed photography allows fast moving phenomena to be recorded with precision and clarity. While in 1948 high-speed photography was defined as a set of at least 3 photographs taken by a camera capable of recording a minimum of 128 frames per second, today’s equipment can shoot as many as 1 million frames per second.

High-speed photography was first put to practical use in 1878 to investigate whether or not a trotting horse ever has all 4 feet off the ground at once. What did the images show?
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By Jingo

The expression “by Jingo” is apparently a minced oath that appeared rarely in print, but which may be traced as far back as to at least the 17th century in a transparent euphemism for “by Jesus“.

The OED attests the first appearance in 1694, in an English edition of the works of François Rabelais as a translation for the French par Dieu! (“by God!”).

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/By_Jingo

glasnost | Soviet government policy | Britannica.com

Read More - Source: Here's the Old Catch Phrase Daily

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The Russian word glasnost, translated as “openness,” refers to the Soviet policy of open discussion of political and social issues. The policy was instituted by Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev in the late 1980s and began the democratization of the Soviet Union.

Source: glasnost | Soviet government policy | Britannica.com

Brobdingnagian

brobdingnagian

In Jonathan Swift’s novel Gulliver’s Travels, Brobdingnag is the name of a land that is populated by a race of human giants “as tall as an ordinary spire steeple.” In Gulliver’s first close-up encounter with the giants……

Source: Brobdingnagian | Definition of Brobdingnagian by Merriam-Webster

Gazanging

Gazanging is a term used in the UK to describe when a vendor pulls out of a property transaction and opts to stay put, having previously accepted an offer.[1]

Frequently, this occurs due to a change in circumstances, such that the seller no longer wishes to move, or are unable to…

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gazanging

The Curious Case of the Word ‘Sonder’

sonder n. the realization that each random passerby is living a life as vivid and complex as your own—populated with their own ambitions, friends, routines, worries and inherited craziness—an epic story that continues invisibly around you like an anthill sprawling deep underground, with elaborate passageways to thousands of other lives that you’ll never know existed, in which you might appear only once, as an extra sipping coffee in the background, as a blur of traffic passing on the highway, as a lighted window at dusk.

 

Source: The Curious Case of the Word ‘Sonder’ @ Niel de la Rouviere

Awww, man! They gave me broccoli again!

Awww, man! They gave me broccoli again!

I found a Catch Phrase Creator on a website and had to try it out. Doesn’t make much sense but I like it! Try it yourself (and don’t forget to send me any good ones).

http://www.proprofs.com/quiz-school/story.php?title=whats-your-random-catch-phrase

 

glasnost | Soviet government policy | Britannica.com

The Russian word glasnost, translated as “openness,” refers to the Soviet policy of open discussion of political and social issues. The policy was instituted by Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev in the late 1980s and began the democratization of the Soviet Union.

Source: glasnost | Soviet government policy | Britannica.com

The Capgras Delusion

The Capgras Delusion is a rare
disorder in which a person holds the delusional belief
that an acquaintance (usually a spouse or other close
family member) has been replaced by an identical
impostor. Found in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia,
dementia, or those suffering from a brain injury, the
disorder is named after Joseph Capgras, the French
psychiatrist who first described it in 1923.
…read more

Advowson

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For the process for appointing a parish priest in the Church of England, see Parish.

Advowson (or “patronage”) is the right in English law of a patron (avowee) to present to the diocesan bishop (or in some cases the ordinary if not the same person) a nominee for appointment to a vacant ecclesiastical benefice or church living, a process known as presentation (jus praesentandi, Latin: “the right of presenting”).

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onism – n. the awareness of how little of the world you’ll…

Read More - Source: OLPend

This article came to our attention via OLPend

onism – n. the awareness of how little of the world you’ll experience

Imagine standing in front of the departures screen at an airport, flickering over with strange place names like other people’s passwords, each representing one more thing you’ll never get to see before you die—and all because, as the arrow on the map helpfully points out, you are here.

See Also…

onism n.

the frustration of being stuck in just one body, that inhabits only one place at a time, which is like standing in front of the departures screen at an airport, flickering over with strange place names like other people’s passwords, each representing one more thing you’ll never get to see before you die—and all because, as the arrow on the map helpfully points out, you are here.

The Hidden Art of Steganography

Read More - Source: OLPend

This article came to our attention via OLPend

Steganography is the practice of hiding secret messages in seemingly innocuous documents such as pictures, articles, or shopping lists. The practice dates to the 5th c BCE, when early practitioners concealed information under the wax of wooden writing tablets or on the tattooed scalps of slaves. As technology evolved, so did steganography; and today, information is often hidden in computer files.

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flashover

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This article came to our attention via OLPend

n. the moment a conversation becomes real and alive, which occurs when a spark of trust shorts out the delicate circuits you keep insulated under layers of irony, momentarily grounding the static emotional charge you’ve built up through decades of friction with the world.

Reverse Engineering

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This article came to our attention via OLPend

Reverse engineering is the process of discovering the technological principles of a device through analysis of its structure, function, and operation. It often involves taking apart an electronic component, software program, or other device in order to redesign the system for better maintainability or produce a copy of a system without access to the original design. Militaries often use reverse engineering to copy other nations’ technology.

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