By Jingo

The expression “by Jingo” is apparently a minced oath that appeared rarely in print, but which may be traced as far back as to at least the 17th century in a transparent euphemism for “by Jesus“.

The OED attests the first appearance in 1694, in an English edition of the works of François Rabelais as a translation for the French par Dieu! (“by God!”).

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/By_Jingo

The man on the Clapham omnibus – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The man on the Clapham omnibus is a hypothetical reasonable person, used by the courts in English law where it is necessary to decide whether a party has acted as a reasonable person would – for example, in a civil action for negligence. The man on the Clapham omnibus is a reasonably educated and intelligent but nondescript person, against whom the defendant’s conduct can be measured.

Source: The man on the Clapham omnibus – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sonder

n. the realization that each random passerby is living a life as vivid and complex as your own—populated with their own ambitions, friends, routines, worries and inherited craziness—an epic story that continues invisibly around you like an anthill sprawling deep underground, with elaborate passageways to thousands of …

Read More: The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows – Sonder

pestilence

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Definition: (noun) A usually fatal epidemic disease, especially bubonic plague.
Synonyms: plague.
Usage: The place might have been desolated by a pestilence, so empty and so lifeless did it now appear. …read more

roster

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This article came to our attention via OLPend

Definition: (noun) A list, especially of names.

Synonyms: roll.

Usage: The spy’s mission was to compile a roster of officials amenable to bribery.

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glasnost | Soviet government policy | Britannica.com

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The Russian word glasnost, translated as “openness,” refers to the Soviet policy of open discussion of political and social issues. The policy was instituted by Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev in the late 1980s and began the democratization of the Soviet Union.

Source: glasnost | Soviet government policy | Britannica.com