May 12, 2020 – NATIONAL LIMERICK DAY – NATIONAL NUTTY FUDGE DAY – NATIONAL ODOMETER DAY – NATIONAL FIBROMYALGIA AWARENESS DAY

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MEDIA ALERT | NEW DAY PROCLAMATION | NATIONAL YUCATAN SHRIMP DAY – May 24

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NATIONAL YUCATÁN SHRIMP DAY National Yucatán Shrimp Day on May 24th celebrates a dish exploding with flavor. Plump, peel-and-eat shrimp are the centerpiece of this dish, and the flavors remind diners of the sunny summer evenings. Shrimp lovers shouldn’t miss out on a dish like this. While the Yucatán Peninsula is further south on the […]

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Frost Saints’ Days

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These three consecutive days in May mark the feasts of St. Mammertus, St. Pancras, and St. Servatus. In the wine-growing districts of France, a severe cold spell occasionally strikes at this time of year, inflicting serious damage on the grapevines; some in rural France have believed that it is the result of their having offended one of the three saints, who for this reason are called the "frost saints." French farmers have been known to show their displeasure over a cold snap at this time of year by flogging the statues and defacing the pictures of Mammertus, Pancras, and Servatus. Discuss

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The Pullman Strike Begins (1894)

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The Pullman Strike was a strike of about 50,000 US rail workers. It was initiated after the Pullman railcar company cut wages by 25%, yet kept rents high in the company-owned town where workers lived. The company refused arbitration, and the railway union called for a strike and nationwide boycott. Sympathy strikes followed in 27 states. In July, the president dispatched troops, who clashed with workers and broke the strike. The troops were sent in after workers halted trains carrying what? Discuss

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Salvador Dalí (1904)

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Dalí was a Spanish painter whose striking images and eccentric personality made him the world's most recognized surrealist artist. Influenced by the theories and dream studies of Sigmund Freud, he painted nightmarishly absurd scenes in precise, realistic detail, creating worlds in which everyday objects are deformed or metamorphosed in strange ways. In his most famous work, The Persistence of Memory, limp watches melt in an eerie landscape. Which candy brand's logo was designed by Dalí? Discuss

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Chinchorro Mummies

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Dating to 6,000 BCE, the Chinchorro mummies of South America are the world’s oldest—a few thousand years older than their Egyptian counterparts. The Chinchorro mummification process evolved over centuries and typically involved removing the skin; stripping tissue from bone; replacing the tissue with ash paste, fur, or plant fiber; and re-covering the body with its skin. The face and other details were modeled in clay, and the body was painted. What was unique about the people who were mummified? Discuss

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May 11, 2020 – NATIONAL EAT WHAT YOU WANT DAY – NATIONAL TWILIGHT ZONE DAY – NATIONAL FOAM ROLLING DAY – NATIONAL WOMEN’S CHECKUP DAY

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John Wilkes Booth (1838)

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Born into a family of famous actors, Booth made his acting debut at the age of 17. Touring widely, he soon became a wealthy celebrity, earning acclaim for his Shakespearean roles. However, he harbored deep Confederate sympathies and viewed President Abraham Lincoln as a tyrant. In April of 1865, he assassinated Lincoln at Ford's Theater, where Lincoln had previously watched him perform. Twelve days later, Booth was shot and killed by a Union soldier. Who else had Booth conspired to have killed? Discuss

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Victoria Woodhull Is Nominated for President of the US (1872)

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Woodhull was a prominent US women's rights advocate, suffragist, and owner of a weekly publication known for printing the first English translation of The Communist Manifesto. In May of 1872, she became the first female candidate for president when a group of suffragists formed a political party and nominated her, but because she was a woman many disputed the legality of her candidacy. What famous African-American was nominated to be her vice-president—possibly without his knowledge? Discuss

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National Hospital Week

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In the United States, the anniversary of Florence Nightingale's (1820-1910) birth has been celebrated since 1921 as National Hospital Day. The May 12 observance was expanded to a week-long event in 1953 so that hospitals could use it to plan and implement more extensive public information programs. Sponsored by the American Hospital Association, National Hospital Week provides an opportunity to educate the community about the services hospitals offer and to keep the public up to date on technological advances in healthcare. Discuss

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Cataphracts

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Originating in Central Asia, cataphracts were heavily-armored cavalry whose horses were also covered with armor made of metal scales. The name, which also refers to the armor itself, comes from the Greek word for "armored." Cataphracts were first used as elite cavalry by the Assyrians around 1000 BCE, and were adopted by numerous peoples in Eurasia, such as the Parthians, Sassanids, and Romans. Why did armored cavalry become obsolete in the 15th century? Discuss

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May 10, 2020 – MOTHER’S DAY – NATIONAL CLEAN UP YOUR ROOM DAY – NATIONAL SHRIMP DAY – NATIONAL LIPID DAY – NATIONAL WASHINGTON DAY

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