kuebiko

n. a state of exhaustion inspired by an act of senseless violence, which forces you to revise your image of what can happen in this world—mending the fences of your expectations, weeding out invasive truths, cultivating the perennial good that’s buried under the surface—before propping yourself up in the middle of it like an old scarecrow, who’s bursting at the seams but powerless to do anything but stand there and watch.

lachesism

n. the desire to be struck by disaster—to survive a plane crash, to lose everything in a fire, to plunge over a waterfall—which would put a kink in the smooth arc of your life, and forge it into something hardened and flexible and sharp, not just a stiff prefabricated beam that barely covers the gap between one end of your life and the other.

exulansis

n. the tendency to give up trying to talk about an experience because people are unable to relate to it—whether through envy or pity or simple foreignness—which allows it to drift away from the rest of your life story, until the memory itself feels out of place, almost mythical, wandering restlessly in the fog, no longer even looking for a place to land.

onism – n. the awareness of how little of the world you’ll…



onism - n. the awareness of how little of the world you’ll experience

Imagine standing in front of the departures screen at an airport, flickering over with strange place names like other people’s passwords, each representing one more thing you’ll never get to see before you die—and all because, as the arrow on the map helpfully points out, you are here.

Reverse Engineering

Reverse engineering is the process of discovering the technological principles of a device through analysis of its structure, function, and operation. It often involves taking apart an electronic component, software program, or other device in order to redesign the system for better maintainability or produce a copy of a system without access to the original design. Militaries often use reverse engineering to copy other nations’ technology.

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Bonfim Festival (Festa do Bonfim)

There is a church in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, known as Our Lord of the Happy Ending (bonfim). Today during the Bonfim Festival, hundreds of Brazilian women dress in the traditional white dresses of colonial Bahia and form a procession to the church. The bahianas balance jars of water, scented with blossoms, on their heads. The washing of the steps at Bonfim Basilica on the second Thursday after Epiphany is the highlight of the festival.
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John Belushi (1949)

Belushi was an American comedian, actor, and musician. He started out with the Second City comedy troop in his hometown of Chicago, Illinois, in 1971, achieved national recognition in National Lampoon’s Lemmings in 1973, and joined Saturday Night Live as an original cast member in 1975. He also starred in several films, including Animal House and The Blues Brothers, before dying of a drug overdose in 1982. Who was convicted of involuntary manslaughter for his death?

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Hala Festival

The Hala Festival has been held in Kuwait every year since 1999 to celebrate the coming of spring and to promote Arab culture and the local economy. The festival begins with an opening carnival and parade, culminating in a lavish fireworks display. Over the course of the subsequent weeks, visitors are able to enjoy such features as performances of music from around the Middle East, exhibitions of calligraphy and cars, sporting events, and religious events. Shopping is a focal point of the festival, with more than 100 local merchants taking part in prize drawings and special offers. …read more

MARCH 14, 2019 | NATIONAL PI DAY | NATIONAL POTATO CHIP DAY | NATIONAL AG DAY | WORLD KIDNEY DAY | NATIONAL WRITE DOWN YOUR STORY DAY | NATIONAL LEARN ABOUT BUTTERFLIES DAY | NATIONAL CHILDREN’S CRAFT DAY

National Pi Day is observed annually on March 14th.

The 3rd month and the 14th day of the year is a consistent day to celebrate the mathematical constant π. Also known as pi, the first three and most recognized digits are 3.14.  National Pi Day is celebrated by pi enthusiasts and pie lovers alike!

Read More about National Pi Day

 

Source: National Day Calendar

Feraliminal Lycanthropizer

The Feraliminal Lycanthropizer is a fictional machine invented by American writer David Woodard, whose 1990 pamphlet of the same title speculates on its history and purpose.

The brief, anonymously published work describes a vibration referred to as thanato-auric waves, which the machine electrically generates by combining three infrasonic sine waves (3 Hz, 9 Hz and 0.56 Hz) with concomitant tape loops of unspecified spoken text (two beyond the threshold of decipherability, and two beneath the threshold).

See also https://www.quora.com/q/weirdwiki/Feraliminal-Lycanthropizer-Wikipedia?__filter__=all&__nsrc__=1&__snid3__=4044130613

read more at Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

“Selling Airplanes”

On Aug. 7, 1955, Boeing’s chief of flight testing, the legendary Alvin “Tex” Johnston, pulled an impressive stunt in the prototype of the Boeing 707.

Johnston didn’t just do a flyover. No. At a speed of 490 miles an hour, Johnston executed a barrel roll.

The stunt, called a Barrel Roll, was performed in front of a crowd of 250,000 spectators attending the Gold Cup hydro races which included many airline executives from around the world (who were in Seattle for an annual meeting) in attendance.

When asked what he thought he thought he was doing Johnston answered, “Selling Airplanes”.

Read More: http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/60-years-ago-the-famous-boeing-707-barrel-roll-over-lake-washington/

www.Boeing.com

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing

 

 

 

onomatopoeia

Onomatopoeia noun is a word which itself sounds like what the word means: Bang, crackle, zip, ha-ha, etc.

https://literarydevices.net/onomatopoeia/

Here is a HUGE list of ONOMATOPOEIC words used in complete sentences. You’ll love these original onomatopoeia examples.

http://www.ereadingworksheets.com/figurative-language/poetic-devices/onomatopoeia-examples/

“Never give in–never, never, never, never, in nothing great or small, large or petty…”

“Never give in–never, never, never, never, in nothing great or small, large or petty, never give in except to convictions of honour and good sense. Never yield to force; never yield to the apparently overwhelming might of the enemy.” – Sir Winston Churchill, Speech, 1941, Harrow School

Synchronicity

A term coined by psychologist Carl Jung to describe what he called “meaningful coincidences,” synchronicity is the experience of two or more causally unrelated events that are conceptually similar and have very little chance of occurring together randomly—such as the discovery of the same idea by two different people at approximately the same time. Although Jung had introduced the concept of synchronicity in the 1920s, he did not fully explain it until when? Discuss
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Disabuse

Disabuse verb Sounds like it has something to with stopping abuse, but really means to persuade someone to a view contrary to their own.

Disabuse means to free someone of a belief that is not true. Many teachers of health find that when they teach, they spend as much energy disabusing kids of false beliefs as they do giving them the facts.

Read more… https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/disabuse