André Gide (1869)

This article came to our attention via Today's Birthday

A prolific and unconventional French writer, Gide was controversial for his confessional works, his frank defense of homosexuality, and his espousal of Communism—and subsequent disavowal of it after a visit to the Soviet Union. A champion of society's victims, he spurred reform of French colonial policy in Africa with books such as Travels in the Congo. In one of his most famous quotes, Gide advised that one should believe those who seek the truth and reserve doubt for whom? Discuss

Read More - Source: Today's Birthday

Bielefeld Conspiracy

The Bielefeld conspiracy (German: Bielefeldverschwörung or Bielefeld-Verschwörungpronounced [ˈbiːləfɛltfɛɐ̯ˌʃvøːʁʊŋ]) is a satire of conspiracy theories that originated in 1993 in the German Usenet, which claims that the city of Bielefeld, Germany, does not exist,[1] but is an illusion propagated by various forces. Originally an internet phenomenon, the conspiracy has since been mentioned in the city’s marketing,[2]and referenced by Chancellor Angela Merkel.[3]

Read More at Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bielefeld_conspiracy

Mollie Steimer (1897)

This article came to our attention via Today's Birthday

After immigrating to New York City from Russia as a teen, Steimer worked in the garment industry, where she became involved in workers' rights and anarchism. After joining a Jewish anarchist collective, she began publishing leaflets that opposed US involvement in World War I. Arrested for distributing them, she was convicted under the Espionage Act and deported to Russia. She was soon forced to leave Russia, and later fled both Germany and France. Where did she spend the rest of her life? Discuss

Read More - Source: Today's Birthday

Mobile International Festival

This article came to our attention via Today's Holiday

Founded in 1982, the Mobile International Festival is meant to share the many cultures of the Mobile, Alabama, community with the public. The festival begins with an opening ceremony and a parade of flags. The Mobile Civic Center houses native dancers, costumes, crafts, musical concerts, acrobats, martial arts, puppet theatre, and cuisine from such countries as Japan, Korea, Ireland, Kenya, China, Greece, Panama, Indonesia, Mexico, Nepal, and India. Visitors are given a "passport" when they enter the festival and collect a stamp as they visit each country's cultural exhibit. Discuss

Read More - Source: Today's Holiday

Rebecca Latimer Felton Becomes the First Female US Senator (1922)

This article came to our attention via This Day in History

Georgia Governor Thomas Hardwick unsuccessfully fought the 19th Amendment, which allowed women to vote—and to vote against him in retaliation when he ran for US Senate. Before the election, he tried to appease female voters by naming Felton, an 87-year-old suffragist and white supremacist, to be Georgia's interim senator for the shortest term in history—one day. Felton thus became the first woman, one of the last former slave-owners, and the oldest freshman to serve. Did Hardwick's ploy work? Discuss

Read More - Source: This Day in History

Skiffle

This article came to our attention via Article of the Day

Skiffle is a genre of music incorporating blues, folk, jazz, and country influences, but performed using homemade instruments. Though skiffle performers sometimes use banjos or guitars, they also make use of washboards, jugs, tubs, and comb-and-paper kazoos. Skiffle originated in the US in the early 20th century before spreading to the UK. By the late 1950s, there were as many as 50,000 skiffle groups in the UK—including the band that would become The Beatles. What was the group's name? Discuss

Read More - Source: Article of the Day

E Pluribus Unum (Latin for “One from many”)

The motto E Pluribus Unum (Latin for “One from many”) was approved for use on the Great Seal of the United States in 1782, but was never adopted as the national motto through legislative action.

The motto of the United States itself is In God We Trust, proclaimed by Congress and signed into law by President Dwight D. Eisenhower on July 30, 1956.

Read More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._state_and_territory_mottos

 

 

 

November 21, 2020 – NATIONAL RED MITTEN DAY – NATIONAL ADOPTION DAY – NATIONAL STUFFING DAY – NATIONAL GINGERBREAD COOKIE DAY

Read More - Source: OLcal.CatchPhraseDaily.com

This article came to our attention via OLcal.CatchPhraseDaily.com

The post November 21, 2020 – NATIONAL RED MITTEN DAY – NATIONAL ADOPTION DAY – NATIONAL STUFFING DAY – NATIONAL GINGERBREAD COOKIE DAY appeared first on National Day Calendar.

Opening of the Underground Caves Day

This article came to our attention via Today's Holiday

The end of World War II is marked annually by the people of Butaritari Island (northern islands of the independent republic of Kiribati). Each year, they open the caves that were built to shelter them during WWII. Accompanied by a celebration, the event takes place on the anniversary of the day the caves initially were opened after the war ended in 1945. The event's main activities take place in Ukiangang village on Butaritari Island, featuring singing, dancing, feasting, and indoor and outdoor games. Discuss

Read More - Source: Today's Holiday

Alistair Cooke (1908)

This article came to our attention via Today's Birthday

Cooke was a British-American journalist and broadcaster. To British audiences, he was famous for his lively and insightful interpretations of American life and culture. His weekly Letter from America, which aired for 58 years, was one of the longest-running programs in radio. To American television audiences, he was the epitome of the elegant English gentleman, hosting public television's Masterpiece Theater for 20 years. After he died, his bones were stolen and used for what? Discuss

Read More - Source: Today's Birthday

Charlotte Perkins Gilman

This article came to our attention via Quote of the Day

The mother as a social servant instead of a home servant will not lack in true mother duty. From her work, loved and honored though it is, she will return to her home life, the child life, with an eager, ceaseless pleasure, cleansed of all the fret and fraction and weariness that so mar it now. Discuss

Read More - Source: Quote of the Day

Microsoft Windows 1.0 Is Released (1985)

This article came to our attention via This Day in History

Though Microsoft announced its new operating system in the fall of 1983, it was not ready for release until two years later, and the long delay led critics to label the product "vaporware." Even after Windows 1.0 finally hit the market, it was not particularly popular. Still, Windows was more user-friendly than the spare MS-DOS upon which it was built, and it allowed users to multitask. Two years later, it was superseded by Windows 2.0. When did Microsoft finally stop supporting Windows 1.0? Discuss

Read More - Source: This Day in History

Barefoot Parks

This article came to our attention via Article of the Day

Popular in Europe, barefoot parks are places where visitors can dispense with shoes and safely experience various landscape textures underfoot. Their well-maintained terrain affords visitors the opportunity to walk across different types of soil, wade through streams, and even practice climbing—all while barefoot. Some parks offer activities such as foot gymnastics, in which people can practice picking up objects with their feet. How might barefoot parks improve one’s overall comfort and health? Discuss

Read More - Source: Article of the Day

Charlotte Perkins Gilman

This article came to our attention via Quote of the Day

The mother as a social servant instead of a home servant will not lack in true mother duty. From her work, loved and honored though it is, she will return to her home life, the child life, with an eager, ceaseless pleasure, cleansed of all the fret and fraction and weariness that so mar it now.

Read More - Source: Quote of the Day

Charlotte Perkins Gilman

This article came to our attention via Quote of the Day

The mother as a social servant instead of a home servant will not lack in true mother duty. From her work, loved and honored though it is, she will return to her home life, the child life, with an eager, ceaseless pleasure, cleansed of all the fret and fraction and weariness that so mar it now.

Read More - Source: Quote of the Day