Napoleonic Code Adopted in France (1804)

One of Napoleon’s first priorities after coming to power was revising the outdated French legal system. The resulting code was a clear framework of laws regarding property, family, and personal rights, replacing an antiquated, confusing patchwork of feudal laws. The code has since been amended but remains in effect in France. In the 200 years since it was enacted, the code has also influenced the laws of many European countries, the US state of Louisiana, and what Middle Eastern country? Discuss
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William Charles Lunalilo (1835)

The shortest-reigning monarch in Hawaiian history, Lunalilo was unanimously elected by the legislature after the death of Kamehameha V, who had declined to name an heir. Just 13 months later, the similarly heirless Lunalilo died of alcoholism and tuberculosis. His goal of a more democratic Hawaii had earned him the nickname “the People’s King,” and he was buried in a common cemetery rather than in the royal mausoleum. What was his reward for having composed Hawaii’s first national anthem?
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Pierre Gassendi (1592)

As a priest and a professor, Gassendi lectured on theology in his native southeastern France. However, as a philosopher, scientist, and astronomer, he was compelled to try to reconcile his scientific beliefs with the teachings of the church. Dissatisfied with the teachings of Aristotle, he came to espouse empiricism and atomism, the belief that tiny, indestructible particles form the basic building blocks of the entire universe.

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Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864)

 

Toulouse-Lautrec developed his interest in art as a teen during a lengthy convalescence after breaking both his legs in separate accidents. At 21, he set up his own studio in Paris, but alcoholism brought about his early demise at 36. Even so, he left an enormous and influential body of work, which captured the atmosphere of Paris brothels and cabaret life with intense colors and remarkable objectivity. His lithographs and posters are now world-renowned.
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Sophia Jex-Blake (1840)

 

In 1858, Jex-Blake enrolled in college against the wishes of her parents. She struggled to find a medical school that would accept women, and though she persuaded the University of Edinburgh to admit her, she could not graduate. She took her fight to Parliament, which passed a law enabling women to receive medical degrees. Jex-Blake founded two medical schools for women, and, after obtaining her degree in 1877, became the third female doctor in the UK.
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Automatic Writing

Used as a form of channeling by proponents of Spiritualism and the New Age movement, automatic writing is a writing process that is performed without conscious thought or deliberation, at times, while the writer is in a trancelike state.

Practitioners often attribute the resulting message to aliens, the deceased, the subconscious, or even God. Skeptics note, however, that there is no evidence to support such claims. Which books have allegedly been written using this technique?¬† …read more

The Tennis Court Oath (1789)

In the first days of the French Revolution, the deputies of the Third Estate were locked out of their usual meeting hall at Versailles. Believing that their newly formed National Assembly was to be disbanded, they met at a nearby tennis court and took an oath to not separate until a constitution was established for France. The oath was an assertion that power came from the people not the monarch, and their solidarity forced King Louis XVI to concede. Who was the only deputy not to sign the oath? Discuss
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Bouncing Betty

The German S-mine, nicknamed the ‚Äúbouncing betty‚ÄĚ by US troops during World War II, is the best-known example of a bounding mine. These land mines are designed to attack unshielded infantry by launching into the air, exploding at waist-height, and propelling shrapnel outward at lethal speeds. One of the definitive weapons of the war, the S-mine often maimed rather than killed its victims and was one of the most feared devices encountered by Allied troops‚Ķread more

 

bear the brunt

Put¬†up¬†with¬†the¬†worst¬†of¬†some¬†bad¬†circumstance,¬†as in¬†“It¬†was¬†the¬†secretary¬†who¬†had¬†to¬†bear¬†the¬†brunt¬†of¬†the doctor’s¬†anger.”

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Related Words for¬†‘bear the brunt’

withstand, brave, undergo, feel, tolerate, experience, face, weather, sustain, suffer, encounter, know, accustom, stomach, stick, support, brook, abide, countenance, stand

retinue

retinue – (noun) – The group following and attending to some important person.
Synonyms: entourage, cortege, suite.

Usage: Guillaume Lejean…reached Karthoum by way of the Red Sea, and embarked upon the Nile with a retinue of twenty-one hired men and twenty soldiers.

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Edward “Eddie” Rickenbacker (1890)

 

A skilled American racecar driver, Rickenbacker entered World War I as a driver but soon became a fighter pilot. He shot down 26 enemy aircraft, earning the Congressional Medal of Honor and the moniker “Ace of Aces.” After a failed foray into automobile manufacturing, he ran several airlines for General Motors and eventually acquired one of them. In 1942, his plane was lost while on a tour of military bases in the Pacific, and he was presumed dead, but he was rescued after 24 days adrift?
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Gazumping

Gazumping occurs when a seller (especially of property) accepts an oral offer (a promise to purchase) on the property from one potential buyer, but then accepts a higher offer from someone else. It can also refer to the seller raising the asking price or asking for more money at the last minute, after previously orally agreeing to a lower one…

Read More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gazumping