Disabuse

Disabuse verb Sounds like it has something to with stopping abuse, but really means to persuade someone to a view contrary to their own.

Disabuse means to free someone of a belief that is not true. Many teachers of health find that when they teach, they spend as much energy disabusing kids of false beliefs as they do giving them the facts.

Read more… https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/disabuse

“What’s the Frequency, Kenneth?”

“What’s the Frequency, Kenneth?”

R.E.M.’s song title refers to an incident in New York City in 1986, when two then-unknown assailants attacked journalist Dan Rather, while repeating “Kenneth, what is the frequency?”

Read More about the incident here: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=What%27s+the+frequency%2C+Kenneth%3F

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

What’s the Frequency, Kenneth?” is a song by the American alternative rock band R.E.M. from their 1994 album Monster. It was the first single taken from the album, released three weeks later. It peaked at number 21 on the Billboard Hot 100, number 9 on the UK Singles Chart, and was the first song to debut at number one on Billboard Modern Rock Tracks.

See Also on Wikipedia: Dan Rather#”Kenneth, what is the frequency?”.

Bishop Mule Days

This is a raucous salute in Bishop, California, to that workhorse of the ages, the mule. Mule Days was started in 1969 by mule-packers who wanted to have a good time and initiate their summer packing season. Now about 50,000 people show up in Bishop for the celebration. A highlight is the Saturday morning 250-unit parade, billed as the world’s largest non-motorized parade. Other events include mule-shoeing contests and such muleback cowboy events as steer roping and barrel racing. There are also mule shows and sales, western art, barbecues, and country dances.
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“Danger, Will Robinson”

“Danger, Will Robinson!” is a catchphrase from the 1960s’ American television series Lost in Space spoken by voice actor Dick Tufeld. The Robot B9, acting as a surrogate guardian, says this to young Will Robinson when the boy is unaware of an impending threat.

In everyday use, the phrase warns someone that they are about to make a mistake or that they are overlooking something. The phrase is also used in hacker culture.

Read More…. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danger,_Will_Robinson

Burning Man Festival

Burning Man is a counterculture festival held in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert, conceived by Larry Harvey in 1986 to honor the Summer Solstice. It has since become a populist phenomenon, where participants set up a temporary “city,” creating their own community. People are expected to interact with one another, produce and display artwork, play music, do sponteneous performances—as long as they actively participate. The 50-foot-high Man towers over Black Rock City until the climax of the festival on Saturday night, when the figure is ignited and the Man becomes a fiery blaze. Discuss
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Kilroy Was Here

Photo by kelliwhitman
“Kilroy was here” is an American popular culture expression that is believed to have originated during World War II, when a US shipyard worker began scrawling the phrase on ships he had inspected. US servicemen then took up the saying and began scrawling it all over the world, wherever they were stationed or encamped. The phrase is usually paired with a doodle of a man peeking over a wall, a cartoon that was likely adopted from UK wartime graffiti that was often accompanied by what slogans?

…read more at The Free Dictionary

“It’ll be alright!”

“It’ll be alright!”

This was an old catch phrase I used to reassure people that what appeared to be a big mess was actually not anything to sweat in my book.

It usually worked well!

 

 

Adoxography

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Adoxography is a term coined in the late 19th century, and means “fine writing on a trivial or base subject”. It was a form of rhetorical exercise “in which the legitimate methods of the encomium are applied to persons or objects in themselves obviously unworthy of praise, as being trivial, ugly, useless, ridiculous, dangerous or vicious”

Source: Adoxography – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Useful idiot – noun

A useful idiot is a derogatory term for a person perceived as propagandizing for a cause without fully comprehending the cause’s goals, and who is cynically used by the cause’s leaders.

The term was originally used during the Cold War to describe non-communists regarded as susceptible to communist propaganda and manipulation. The term has often been attributed to Vladimir Lenin, but this attribution is unsubstantiated.

Read More: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Useful_idiot

See also: Useful idiot (disambiguation)

wytai

wytai – noun –  a feature of modern society that suddenly strikes you as absurd and grotesque—from zoos and milk-drinking to organ transplants, life insurance, and fiction—part of the faint background noise of absurdity that reverberates from the moment our ancestors first crawled out of the slime but could not for the life of them remember what they got up to do.

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Liberosis

liberosis n.

the desire to care less about things—to loosen your grip on your life, to stop glancing behind you every few steps, afraid that someone will snatch it …

I’m Your Huckleberry

19th century slang which was popularized more recently by the movie Tombstone. Means “I’m the man you’re looking for”.
 
Nowadays it’s usually used as a response to a threat or challenge, as in the movie.
 
“Who thinks they can beat me?”
“I’m your huckleberry.”
 

“I Accidentally…”

“I Accidentally…” is a catchphrase, internet slang, and trolling mechanism meant to exploit the imagination of English-speaking internet users. It is used by constructing a complete sentence that begins with “I accidentally” and removing the verb, leaving readers wondering what had been there in the first place.

http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/i-accidentally

http://www.fark.com/comments/6108474/Photoshop-theme-I-accidentally-whole-thing