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Heike Kamerlingh Onnes (1853)

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A Dutch physicist and professor at the University of Leiden, Onnes founded in 1884 a cryogenic laboratory that would become a renowned research center for low-temperature physics. He was the first to produce liquid helium, and in the process produced a temperature within a degree of absolute zero. He also discovered superconductivity—the abnormally high electrical conductivity of certain materials at very low temperatures. When he first observed superconductivity, what did he think it was? Discuss

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“Yes, Virginia, There Is a Santa Claus” Editorial Is Published (1897)

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In 1897, eight-year-old Virginia O'Hanlon of New York City asked her father if Santa Claus was real. When he suggested that "if you see it in The Sun, it's so," she wrote to the newspaper and asked. Editor Francis Pharcellus Church's lengthy, touching reply became one of the most reprinted newspaper editorials in US history. "Alas! how dreary would be the world if there were no Santa Claus. It would be as dreary as if there were no Virginias," wrote Church. What happened to Virginia? Discuss

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Flan

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Flan is a dessert made by adding custard to a caramel-lined mold. After it is baked, then chilled, it is tipped out of the mold so the caramel is on top. The dish is popular around the world, from Europe to the Philippines to Latin America, and one form is a staple of Japanese convenience stores. Though flan is typically vanilla-flavored, it can be made with a number of other flavors, such as almond or chocolate. A variation of flan popular in Puerto Rico contains an added layer of what? Discuss

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International Day of Peace

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This is a day proclaimed by the U.N. each year to promote the ideals of peace. The first official observance of the International Day of Peace was in September 1982. At the United Nations, the day is marked with a special message by the secretary-general, who then rings the Japanese Peace Bell and invites people throughout the world to reflect on the meaning of peace. Special events are organized in various countries, and in the United States the mayors of a number of cities issue proclamations for the day. Discuss

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September 21, 2020 – NATIONAL CHAI DAY – NATIONAL PECAN COOKIE DAY – NATIONAL NEW YORK DAY

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The post September 21, 2020 – NATIONAL CHAI DAY – NATIONAL PECAN COOKIE DAY – NATIONAL NEW YORK DAY appeared first on National Day Calendar.

James Meredith Is Barred from the University of Mississippi (1962)

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After a US federal court ruled that colleges could not deny admission to qualified students on the basis of race, civil rights activist James Meredith prepared to enter the segregated University of Mississippi. On the day of Meredith's enrollment, Mississippi Governor Ross Barnett stood in the doorway of the admissions office, physically blocking Meredith's entry, and informed him that his application was denied. Ten days later, Meredith returned—with 500 federal marshals. What happened then? Discuss

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Mothman Festival

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In 1966, the first sightings of a creature that came to be known as Mothman were first reported in the small town of Point Pleasant, West Virginia. Since 2001, the Mothman Museum of Point Pleasant has sponsored the Mothman Festival. Those interested in the Mothman phenomena and in such paranormal topics as ghosts and UFOs gather in the town. Merchandise booths are set up along the town's main streets, and posters, books, T-shirts, and a host of other products are available. Music concerts are also held along the river. Discuss

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Maxwell Perkins (1884)

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After joining the publishing firm of Charles Scribner's Sons, Perkins became an enormously well-regarded editor with a genius for recognizing and fostering new talent. Though best known for the intensive editorial work that shaped Thomas Wolfe's sprawling manuscripts into publishable form, he also edited and published early works by then-unknown writers such as F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, and Erskine Caldwell. How many words did Perkins persuade Wolfe to cut from his first novel? Discuss

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Mauthausen-Gusen

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A complex of Nazi concentration camps in northern Austria, Mauthausen-Gusen was the scene of terrible atrocities during World War II. Originally affiliated with the Dachau camp, it acquired dozens of its own satellite camps by the end of the war. Though the death toll at Mauthausen-Gusen is unknown, it is estimated that more than 100,000 died there. Many prisoners were used for slave labor in local industries. One quarry was home to the "Stairs of Death," where prisoners were forced to do what? Discuss

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September 20, 2020 – WIFE APPRECIATION DAY – NATIONAL PUNCH DAY – PEPPERONI PIZZA DAY – NATIONAL FRIED RICE DAY – NATIONAL STRING CHEESE DAY

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The post September 20, 2020 – WIFE APPRECIATION DAY – NATIONAL PUNCH DAY – PEPPERONI PIZZA DAY – NATIONAL FRIED RICE DAY – NATIONAL STRING CHEESE DAY appeared first on National Day Calendar.

The Golden Poison Frog

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Despite its diminutive size, the golden poison frog is one of the deadliest creatures in the world. Native to Columbia, the poisonous—but not venomous—frog contains enough of the rare neurotoxin batrachotoxin to kill 10 humans. Indigenous peoples use the toxin on the tips of poison darts and arrows. The intelligent frogs are seemingly unafraid of potential predators. They do not produce the toxin themselves, and lose their toxicity in captivity. Where, then, do they acquire the toxin? Discuss

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Samuel Johnson Commemoration

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Samuel Johnson, the English lexicographer, writer, critic, and conversationalist, was born on this day in 1709. His hometown of Lichfield commemorates its most famous citizen by laying a laurel wreath at the foot of his statue, after which the cathedral choir sings religious songs and intones Dr. Johnson's final prayer on the steps of his birth house. In the evening, there is a candlelight supper based on Dr. Johnson's favorite meal: steak-and-kidney pudding with mushrooms or mutton. The guests are served ale and hot punch by people dressed in costumes of the 18th century. Discuss

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Lajos Kossuth (1802)

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Now considered a national hero, Kossuth was a Hungarian revolutionary who favored dissolving the union between the Hungarian and Austrian crowns. The fiery orator was a principal figure of the 1848 Hungarian Revolution. Appointed provisional governor, he soon became virtual dictator. In 1849, Russian armies intervened in favor of Austria, forcing him to resign. He fled to Turkey and later to Italy, where he watched as Hungary reconciled with the Austrian monarchy. What did he do while in exile? Discuss

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Ötzi the Iceman Is Discovered by German Tourists (1991)

This article came to our attention via This Day in History

In 1991, two hikers discovered a well-preserved corpse trapped in ice near the border between Austria and Italy. It proved to be that of a man who lived about 5,300 years ago—making it the oldest natural mummy ever found. He was nicknamed Ötzi, for the Ötztal Alps where he was found. Also recovered were clothes, shoes, tools, weapons, fire-starting materials, and medicine. Scientists have since determined that Ötzi ate about eight hours before his death. What did he eat, and how did he die? Discuss

Read More - Source: This Day in History