Paraprosdokian

A paraprosdokian is a figure of speech in which the latter part of a sentence, phrase, or larger discourse is surprising or unexpected in a way that causes the reader or listener to reframe or reinterpret the first part. It is frequently used for humorous or dramatic effect, sometimes producing an anticlimax. Wikipedia

 
 
 

Bishop Mule Days

This is a raucous salute in Bishop, California, to that workhorse of the ages, the mule. Mule Days was started in 1969 by mule-packers who wanted to have a good time and initiate their summer packing season. Now about 50,000 people show up in Bishop for the celebration. A highlight is the Saturday morning 250-unit parade, billed as the world’s largest non-motorized parade. Other events include mule-shoeing contests and such muleback cowboy events as steer roping and barrel racing. There are also mule shows and sales, western art, barbecues, and country dances.
…read more

“Danger, Will Robinson”

“Danger, Will Robinson!” is a catchphrase from the 1960s’ American television series Lost in Space spoken by voice actor Dick Tufeld. The Robot B9, acting as a surrogate guardian, says this to young Will Robinson when the boy is unaware of an impending threat.

In everyday use, the phrase warns someone that they are about to make a mistake or that they are overlooking something. The phrase is also used in hacker culture.

Read More…. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danger,_Will_Robinson

Bielefeld Conspiracy

The Bielefeld conspiracy (German: Bielefeldverschwörung or Bielefeld-Verschwörungpronounced [ˈbiːləfɛltfɛɐ̯ˌʃvøːʁʊŋ]) is a satire of conspiracy theories that originated in 1993 in the German Usenet, which claims that the city of Bielefeld, Germany, does not exist,[1] but is an illusion propagated by various forces. Originally an internet phenomenon, the conspiracy has since been mentioned in the city’s marketing,[2]and referenced by Chancellor Angela Merkel.[3]

Read More at Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bielefeld_conspiracy

“It’ll be alright!”

“It’ll be alright!”

This was an old catch phrase I used to reassure people that what appeared to be a big mess was actually not anything to sweat in my book.

It usually worked well!

 

 

Adoxography

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Adoxography is a term coined in the late 19th century, and means “fine writing on a trivial or base subject”. It was a form of rhetorical exercise “in which the legitimate methods of the encomium are applied to persons or objects in themselves obviously unworthy of praise, as being trivial, ugly, useless, ridiculous, dangerous or vicious”

Source: Adoxography – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

“RTFM”

RTFM is an acronym for “Read The F***ing Manual”. RTFM is used in response to a question from a newbie that may be deemed unnecessary or redundant, had that individual done some basic research on the subject beforehand.

The antithesis of RTFM is TL;DR, which stands for “too long; didn’t read.”

 

http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/rtfm

Non sequitur

Non sequitur – noun – Literary device
 
A non sequitur is a conversational literary device, often used for comedic purposes. It is something said that, because of its apparent lack of meaning relative to what preceded it, seems absurd to the point of being humorous or confusing. Wikipedia

“I Accidentally…”

“I Accidentally…” is a catchphrase, internet slang, and trolling mechanism meant to exploit the imagination of English-speaking internet users. It is used by constructing a complete sentence that begins with “I accidentally” and removing the verb, leaving readers wondering what had been there in the first place.

http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/i-accidentally

http://www.fark.com/comments/6108474/Photoshop-theme-I-accidentally-whole-thing

Raymond Kertezc

Raymond Kertezc – Fictional Character

Raymond Kertezc is a fictional Poet included in the Minnesota_Multiphasic_Personality_Inventory assessment, survey or test as a control question to help determine if the respondent is actually paying attention to the test questions.

There are many articles and a few blogs either about our esteemed poet, his purpose, or even some blogs and poetry attributed to Mr. Kertezc.

I’d suggest the diligent student might wish to search Google for the latest ‘sightings’, references, and poetry attributed to Raymond Kertezc Google Search for Raymond Kertezc

Further Reading:

http://abuse.wikia.com/wiki/Raymond_Kertezc

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia%3AArticles_for_deletion%2FRaymond_kertezc

“Lurk Moar”

(Intentionally misspelled)

Lurk Moar is a phrase used by image board and forums posters alike to inform other users they need to post less and study the community before posting again. The phrase can generally be used as a euphemism in a derogatory sense so as to inform users they are not wanted/welcomed, but may also be intended as legitimate advice for new users.

http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/lurk-moar

“RTFM”

RTFM is an acronym for “Read The F***ing Manual”. RTFM is used in response to a question from a newbie that may be deemed unnecessary or redundant, had that individual done some basic research on the subject beforehand.

The antithesis of RTFM is TL;DR, which stands for “too long; didn’t read.”

 

http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/rtfm