Month: December 2019

Santiago, Chile, Founded (1541)

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Santiago is the capital and the largest city of Chile. Just months after it was founded on the banks of the Mapocho River by Spanish conquistadors, the settlement was nearly wiped out by the indigenous Mapuche peoples. Today, it is one of the largest cities in South America, having survived the 1647 earthquake that leveled the city, frequent flooding from the Mapocho, and a number of other calamities. What meteorological phenomenon traps smog in the city? Discuss
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Myanmar Union Day

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In the Union of Myanmar, also known as Burma, Union Day commemorates the day in 1947 that Bogyoke Aung San, a Burmese nationalist leader, helped to unify all of Burma. Five days before Union Day, an annual relay of the Union flag begins. A ceremony to mark the start of the relay is held at City Hall. The flag is carried through 45 townships before arriving at People’s Square on Pyay Road for a Union Day ceremony. Discuss
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Colloidal Silver

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Colloidal silver is a mixture of silver particles and water that has antimicrobial properties. Formerly used on external wounds and burns to prevent infection, colloidal silver is cited by some alternative-health practitioners as a beneficial nutritional supplement and a powerful antibiotic that is relatively safe for human consumption. However, most members of the mainstream medical community warn users that it can lead to argyria, a rare but permanent condition that turns the skin what color? Discuss
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pollinosis

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Definition: (noun) A seasonal rhinitis resulting from an allergic reaction to pollen.
Synonyms: hay fever.
Usage: It was spring, and, just like the garden, his pollinosis was in full-bloom. …read more

The Oxford Comma

In English language punctuation, a serial comma or series comma (also called Oxford comma and Harvard comma) is a comma placed immediately before the coordinating conjunction (usually and or or) in a series of three or more terms.

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Lateran Treaty Signed Between Italy and the Vatican (1929)

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The Lateran Treaty ended the political dispute between the Italian government and the Papacy that began when Italy took Rome as its capital in 1871 and limited papal sovereignty to just a few buildings. The treaty created Vatican City and gave the Holy See sovereignty there. Though Italy was under fascist control when the treaty was signed, successive governments have upheld the agreement. The Lateran Treaty established Roman Catholicism as the state religion of Italy. When did this change?
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diaporama

diaporama is a photographic slideshow, sometimes with accompanying audio, ranging from using only one or two slide projectors to a multi-image slideshow using a wide screen and several slide projectors connected to a central controlling device changing the slides, turning lamps on and off etc.

Diaporama – Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diaporama

The Murders at Wright’s Taliesin

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Famed American architect Frank Lloyd Wright led a turbulent life rife with personal tragedy as well as several failed marriages. In 1909, Wright left his first wife and eloped to Europe with Mamah Cheney, who was also married at the time. When the pair returned to the US, Wright began building a new home, called Taliesin. In August 1914, while Wright was away, one of his workers set fire to Taliesin and murdered 7 people with an axe, including Cheney and her 2 children. Who survived the attack? Discuss
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St. Sarkis’s Day

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In Armenia, St. Sarkis is associated with predictions about love and romance. It is customary for young lovers to put out crumbs for birds and watch to see which way the birds fly off, for it is believed that their future spouse will come from the same direction. It is also traditional to leave some pokhint—a dish made of flour, butter, and honey—outside the door on St. Sarkis’s Day. According to legend, when St. Sarkis was battling the Georgians, the roasted wheat in his pocket miraculously turned into pokhint. Discuss
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Advowson

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For the process for appointing a parish priest in the Church of England, see Parish.

Advowson (or “patronage”) is the right in English law of a patron (avowee) to present to the diocesan bishop (or in some cases the ordinary if not the same person) a nominee for appointment to a vacant ecclesiastical benefice or church living, a process known as presentation (jus praesentandi, Latin: “the right of presenting”).

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The Tennis Court Oath (1789)

In the first days of the French Revolution, the deputies of the Third Estate were locked out of their usual meeting hall at Versailles. Believing that their newly formed National Assembly was to be disbanded, they met at a nearby tennis court and took an oath to not separate until a constitution was established for France. The oath was an assertion that power came from the people not the monarch, and their solidarity forced King Louis XVI to concede. Who was the only deputy not to sign the oath? Discuss
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Tightrope Between the Towers

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Philippe Petit is a French high-wire artist who gained fame for his illegal 1974 walk between the former Twin Towers in New York. After six years of planning, Petit used a 450-pound (204-kg) cable and a 26-foot (8-m), 55-pound (25-kg) balancing pole to make eight crossings between the still unfinished towers—walking, jumping, and lying down on the wire for more than an hour before being arrested when he returned to the tower roof. What punishment did Petit receive for his stunt? Discuss
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bear the brunt

Put up with the worst of some bad circumstance, as in “It was the secretary who had to bear the brunt of the doctor’s anger.”

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Related Words for ‘bear the brunt’

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Jules Gabriel Verne (1828)

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Verne was a French novelist credited with originating the modern genre of science fiction. Early on, he was interested in theater and wrote librettos for operas. Later, he drew upon his knowledge of science and geography to write romances of extraordinary journeys, which quickly became very popular. He wrote more than 50 books in his lifetime, including A Journey to the Center of the Earth and Around the World in Eighty Days. One of his books explores a five-week journey by what? Discuss
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Émile Zola Is Put on Trial for Publishing “J’Accuse” (1898)

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A Jewish officer in the French army, Alfred Dreyfus was falsely convicted of treason in 1894. When officers discovered that the evidence against Dreyfus was false—and that he was most likely a victim of anti-Semitism—they covered it up. Writer Émile Zola exposed the scandal by publishing in a newspaper an open letter titled “J’accuse.” Zola was tried and convicted of criminal libel but fled the country, which was divided by the scandal. What happened to Dreyfus and Zola? Discuss
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Laura Elizabeth Ingalls Wilder (1867)

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Wilder was the American author of a classic series of children’s books based on her childhood. Born in Wisconsin after the Civil War, she traveled with her pioneer family throughout the Midwest by covered wagon for years before settling in the Dakota Territory. As a farmer and mother she struggled for years. Her first novel, Little House in the Big Woods was not published until 1932, when she was 65. How many of her books, which spawned a popular TV show, were published after her death? Discuss
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Diplodocus

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Due to a wealth of fossil remains, the first of which was found in the late 1870s, Diplodocus is one of the best-studied dinosaurs. The herbivorous dinosaur roamed western North America about 145 million years ago, during the late Jurassic period, walked on four legs, and had an extremely small brain and skull. One of the longest known sauropods, Diplodocus could grow to be 88 ft (27 m) long, most of which was neck and tail. With what man-made structure is it often compared? Discuss
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