Month: September 2019

Feraliminal Lycanthropizer

The Feraliminal Lycanthropizer is a fictional machine invented by American writer David Woodard, whose 1990 pamphlet of the same title speculates on its history and purpose.

The brief, anonymously published work describes a vibration referred to as thanato-auric waves, which the machine electrically generates by combining three infrasonic sine waves (3 Hz, 9 Hz and 0.56 Hz) with concomitant tape loops of unspecified spoken text (two beyond the threshold of decipherability, and two beneath the threshold).

See also https://www.quora.com/q/weirdwiki/Feraliminal-Lycanthropizer-Wikipedia?__filter__=all&__nsrc__=1&__snid3__=4044130613

read more at Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

“Selling Airplanes”

On Aug. 7, 1955, Boeing’s chief of flight testing, the legendary Alvin “Tex” Johnston, pulled an impressive stunt in the prototype of the Boeing 707.

Johnston didn’t just do a flyover. No. At a speed of 490 miles an hour, Johnston executed a barrel roll.

The stunt, called a Barrel Roll, was performed in front of a crowd of 250,000 spectators attending the Gold Cup hydro races which included many airline executives from around the world (who were in Seattle for an annual meeting) in attendance.

When asked what he thought he thought he was doing Johnston answered, “Selling Airplanes”.

Read More: http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/60-years-ago-the-famous-boeing-707-barrel-roll-over-lake-washington/

www.Boeing.com

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing

 

 

 

onomatopoeia

Onomatopoeia noun is a word which itself sounds like what the word means: Bang, crackle, zip, ha-ha, etc.

https://literarydevices.net/onomatopoeia/

Here is a HUGE list of ONOMATOPOEIC words used in complete sentences. You’ll love these original onomatopoeia examples.

http://www.ereadingworksheets.com/figurative-language/poetic-devices/onomatopoeia-examples/

“Never give in–never, never, never, never, in nothing great or small, large or petty…”

“Never give in–never, never, never, never, in nothing great or small, large or petty, never give in except to convictions of honour and good sense. Never yield to force; never yield to the apparently overwhelming might of the enemy.” – Sir Winston Churchill, Speech, 1941, Harrow School

Synchronicity

A term coined by psychologist Carl Jung to describe what he called “meaningful coincidences,” synchronicity is the experience of two or more causally unrelated events that are conceptually similar and have very little chance of occurring together randomly—such as the discovery of the same idea by two different people at approximately the same time. Although Jung had introduced the concept of synchronicity in the 1920s, he did not fully explain it until when? Discuss
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Disabuse

Disabuse verb Sounds like it has something to with stopping abuse, but really means to persuade someone to a view contrary to their own.

Disabuse means to free someone of a belief that is not true. Many teachers of health find that when they teach, they spend as much energy disabusing kids of false beliefs as they do giving them the facts.

Read more… https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/disabuse

Serendipity

Serendipity – noun – the occurrence and development of events by chance in a happy or beneficial way.

synonyms: chance, happy chance, accident, happy accident, fluke

Defined as the faculty of making fortunate discoveries by accident, the word “serendipity” was first coined in 1754 by English author Horace Walpole in one of his more than 3,000 letters. In it, he explains that the root of his new word is taken from “The Three Princes of Serendip,” a Persian fairytale about princes who “were always making discoveries, by accidents and sagacity, of things which they were not in quest of.” Past serendipitous discoveries include x-rays, helium, and what else? …read more

Paraprosdokian

A paraprosdokian is a figure of speech in which the latter part of a sentence, phrase, or larger discourse is surprising or unexpected in a way that causes the reader or listener to reframe or reinterpret the first part. It is frequently used for humorous or dramatic effect, sometimes producing an anticlimax. Wikipedia

 
 
 

Treacle Mining

Treacle mining is the fictitious mining of treacle (similar to molasses) in a raw form similar to coal. The subject purports to be serious but is an attempt to test credulity. Thick black treacle makes the deception plausible. The topic has been a joke in British humour since the mid-19th century.

Read More at Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treacle_mining

“What’s the Frequency, Kenneth?”

“What’s the Frequency, Kenneth?”

R.E.M.’s song title refers to an incident in New York City in 1986, when two then-unknown assailants attacked journalist Dan Rather, while repeating “Kenneth, what is the frequency?”

Read More about the incident here: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=What%27s+the+frequency%2C+Kenneth%3F

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

What’s the Frequency, Kenneth?” is a song by the American alternative rock band R.E.M. from their 1994 album Monster. It was the first single taken from the album, released three weeks later. It peaked at number 21 on the Billboard Hot 100, number 9 on the UK Singles Chart, and was the first song to debut at number one on Billboard Modern Rock Tracks.

See Also on Wikipedia: Dan Rather#”Kenneth, what is the frequency?”.

“This Is the Way We Roll”

“This Is the Way We Roll”

This Is the Way We Roll is a single released byHammer from the album Too Legit to Quit.[1]

The song was featured in the film, The Addams Family, and was performed by Hammer onSaturday Night Live. A music video was produced for the track as well.

Variations of this phrase have become a recent Catch Phrase

Read More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/This_Is_the_Way_We_Roll

 

 

Pakistan Kashmir Solidarity Day

On February 5, 1990, Pakistanis protested against Indian rule in an armed uprising. More than 80,000 Kashmiris lost their lives during the demonstrations. Pakistan People’s Party Government leader Benazir Bhutto responded by declaring the day a public holiday. Along many of the major roads in the capital city, banners are displayed to show Pakistan’s solidarity with the Kashmirs. A five-minute period of silence is observed to remember those who were killed in the uprising. In addition, every province plans their own events, including rallies or processions, seminars, and speeches. Discuss
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Bezoar – It’s a Medical Term

bezoar photo
Photo by Internet Archive Book Images

A bezoar is a mass found trapped in the gastrointestinal system, though it can occur in other locations.

A pseudobezoar is an indigestible object introduced intentionally into the digestive system.

There are several varieties of bezoar, some of which have inorganic constituents and others organic. The term has both a modern (medical, scientific) and a traditional usage.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bezoar

Bishop Mule Days

This is a raucous salute in Bishop, California, to that workhorse of the ages, the mule. Mule Days was started in 1969 by mule-packers who wanted to have a good time and initiate their summer packing season. Now about 50,000 people show up in Bishop for the celebration. A highlight is the Saturday morning 250-unit parade, billed as the world’s largest non-motorized parade. Other events include mule-shoeing contests and such muleback cowboy events as steer roping and barrel racing. There are also mule shows and sales, western art, barbecues, and country dances.
…read more

“Danger, Will Robinson”

“Danger, Will Robinson!” is a catchphrase from the 1960s’ American television series Lost in Space spoken by voice actor Dick Tufeld. The Robot B9, acting as a surrogate guardian, says this to young Will Robinson when the boy is unaware of an impending threat.

In everyday use, the phrase warns someone that they are about to make a mistake or that they are overlooking something. The phrase is also used in hacker culture.

Read More…. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danger,_Will_Robinson

Burning Man Festival

Burning Man is a counterculture festival held in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert, conceived by Larry Harvey in 1986 to honor the Summer Solstice. It has since become a populist phenomenon, where participants set up a temporary “city,” creating their own community. People are expected to interact with one another, produce and display artwork, play music, do sponteneous performances—as long as they actively participate. The 50-foot-high Man towers over Black Rock City until the climax of the festival on Saturday night, when the figure is ignited and the Man becomes a fiery blaze. Discuss
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Bielefeld Conspiracy

The Bielefeld conspiracy (German: Bielefeldverschwörung or Bielefeld-Verschwörungpronounced [ˈbiːləfɛltfɛɐ̯ˌʃvøːʁʊŋ]) is a satire of conspiracy theories that originated in 1993 in the German Usenet, which claims that the city of Bielefeld, Germany, does not exist,[1] but is an illusion propagated by various forces. Originally an internet phenomenon, the conspiracy has since been mentioned in the city’s marketing,[2]and referenced by Chancellor Angela Merkel.[3]

Read More at Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bielefeld_conspiracy

E Pluribus Unum (Latin for “One from many”)

The motto E Pluribus Unum (Latin for “One from many”) was approved for use on the Great Seal of the United States in 1782, but was never adopted as the national motto through legislative action.

The motto of the United States itself is In God We Trust, proclaimed by Congress and signed into law by President Dwight D. Eisenhower on July 30, 1956.

Read More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._state_and_territory_mottos