Oracle Bones

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Oracle bones—often the shoulder blades of oxen or turtles’ shells—were used for divination during China's Shang dynasty, which dates to the 18th century BCE. They were inscribed with questions, then heated to produce cracks from which answers were somehow derived. A small number of them are inscribed with the answers to their questions and eventual outcomes. The inscriptions are some of the earliest examples of Chinese writing. When they were first discovered, what were they believed to be? Discuss

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St. Catherine’s Day

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Estonian folklorists believe that the customs associated with Kadripäev, or St. Catherine's Day in Estonia, may date back to pre-Christian times. The holiday is strongly associated with women and their traditional activities, such as herding. People dress up in light-colored clothing, symbolizing winter's snow, and visit their neighbors, singing songs and offering blessings for the family's animals. In return, householders offer them cloth, wool, or food. An old superstition connected with the day forbade such activities as shearing as a means of protecting the sheep. Discuss

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Agatha Christie’s The Mousetrap Begins Its Record-Breaking Run (1952)

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When The Mousetrap opened in London, Christie, a legendary mystery author, predicted her play would run for just eight months. However, its initial run never ended, and it is now the longest-running play in the world. The murder mystery has been performed more than 24,000 times and is a popular tourist attraction. At the end of each performance, the audience is asked not to reveal the play's notorious twist ending. Who owns the rights to the play, and how did he get them? Discuss

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Bishop Mule Days

This is a raucous salute in Bishop, California, to that workhorse of the ages, the mule. Mule Days was started in 1969 by mule-packers who wanted to have a good time and initiate their summer packing season. Now about 50,000 people show up in Bishop for the celebration. A highlight is the Saturday morning 250-unit parade, billed as the world’s largest non-motorized parade. Other events include mule-shoeing contests and such muleback cowboy events as steer roping and barrel racing. There are also mule shows and sales, western art, barbecues, and country dances.
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November 25, 2020 – NATIONAL TIE ONE ON DAY – BLASE’ DAY – NATIONAL PARFAIT DAY – NATIONAL JUKEBOX DAY – NATIONAL PLAY DAY WITH DAD – SHOPPING REMINDER DAY

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Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864)

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Toulouse-Lautrec developed his interest in art as a teen during a lengthy convalescence after breaking both his legs in separate accidents. At 21, he set up his own studio in Paris, but alcoholism brought about his early demise at 36. Even so, he left an enormous and influential body of work, which captured the atmosphere of Paris brothels and cabaret life with intense colors and remarkable objectivity. His lithographs and posters are now world-renowned. What cocktail is he said to have created? Discuss

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Origen

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Probably the son of a Christian martyr, Origen studied philosophy in Alexandria and became a prolific writer and famed teacher. A stern ascetic, he castrated himself out of a desire for purity. He held that even Satan was not beyond repentance and salvation, a view for which he was condemned. Although attacked as a heretic, Origen remained an influential thinker throughout late antiquity and the Middle Ages. He died around the year 250, shortly after having survived what? Discuss

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Lee Harvey Oswald Murdered by Jack Ruby on Live Television (1963)

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Hours after US President John F. Kennedy was assassinated during a Dallas parade, Lee Harvey Oswald was arrested. After two days of interrogations, Oswald was being led through the basement of the Dallas Police Headquarters to be transferred to a county jail when Dallas nightclub owner Jack Ruby stepped out of the crowd and shot him. Millions of people saw the incident on live television. Despite attempts to link Ruby to some conspiracy, he appears to have acted alone. Where did Oswald die? Discuss

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guttersnipe

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Definition: (noun) A child who spends most of his time in the streets especially in slum areas.
Synonyms: street urchin.
Usage: In Shaw's <i>Pygmalion</i>, an elocution expert plucks a guttersnipe from Covent Garden market and teaches her to talk like a lady.
Discuss

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Martyrdom of Guru Tegh Bahadur

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Tegh Bahadur (1621-1675) was the ninth of the Sikh gurus, or spiritual teachers. In November 1675, he went to Delhi to meet with the Indian emperor Aurangzeb, who had him beheaded because he would not convert to Islam. Sikhs everywhere observe his martyrdom with religious processions and pilgrimages at gurdwaras, or houses of worship, with a special devotion to him, and especially at the site of his martyrdom in Delhi at the Gurdwara Sisganj temple.

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“Danger, Will Robinson”

“Danger, Will Robinson!” is a catchphrase from the 1960s’ American television series Lost in Space spoken by voice actor Dick Tufeld. The Robot B9, acting as a surrogate guardian, says this to young Will Robinson when the boy is unaware of an impending threat.

In everyday use, the phrase warns someone that they are about to make a mistake or that they are overlooking something. The phrase is also used in hacker culture.

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The National Day Wall Calendar and the Page-A-Day Calendar. The gifts the keep on giving all year long!

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That’s right.  The 2021 Celebrate Every Day National Day Wall Calendars and the Page-A-Day Desk Calendars are in house and shipping! Both calendars have limited stock but we currently have less than 700 left of the Page-A-Days so these will sell out soon!. More Information. This is the most fun you will ever have with a […]

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Red River Ox Carts

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Red River ox carts were a vital form of transportation during the 19th-century westward expansion in the US and Canada. They carried fur to trading posts in places like St. Paul, Minnesota, and then carried supplies back to settlements along the Red River of the North, which now forms the Minnesota–North Dakota border. Built entirely of wood and animal hide—and no metal—the carts typically had two wheels, which were notorious for their constant creaking. Why couldn't their axles be greased? Discuss

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The People’s Republic of China Joins the UN Security Council (1971)

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The 1949 Communist takeover of mainland China created the People's Republic of China (PRC). The former government, known as the Republic of China (ROC), retained control only of Taiwan and outlying islands. However, for the next 22 years, the ROC also held onto its seat in the UN, representing the mainland it no longer controlled. UN Resolution 2758 finally transferred China's seat to representatives of the PRC. Since then, the ROC has repeatedly applied to rejoin the UN under what names? Discuss

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Franklin Pierce (1804)

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In 1852, the Democratic party of the US was split into hostile factions, none of which could muster sufficient strength to secure the presidential nomination. The charming and unobjectionable Pierce was nominated as a compromise candidate. He unexpectedly trounced his opposition in the general election despite being largely unknown beforehand. However, Pierce proved unable to mediate slavery-related political troubles. As a testament to his unpopularity, he was the first US president to do what? Discuss

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Repudiation Day

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The Stamp Act of 1765 forced the American colonies to pay a tax on various official documents and publications, such as legal papers, liquor permits, lawyers' licenses, and school diplomas. In defiance of the new law, the court of Frederick County, Maryland, declared that it would carry on its business without the tax stamps required by the Act. The date on which the Stamp Act was repudiated, November 23, has been observed for many years as a half-holiday in Frederick County to commemorate this.

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Burning Man Festival

Burning Man is a counterculture festival held in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert, conceived by Larry Harvey in 1986 to honor the Summer Solstice. It has since become a populist phenomenon, where participants set up a temporary “city,” creating their own community. People are expected to interact with one another, produce and display artwork, play music, do sponteneous performances—as long as they actively participate. The 50-foot-high Man towers over Black Rock City until the climax of the festival on Saturday night, when the figure is ignited and the Man becomes a fiery blaze. Discuss
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Toy Story, First Feature-Length Computer-Generated Film, Is Released (1995)

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Released to universal acclaim, Toy Story was the first feature-length computer-generated film, as well as the first such film from Pixar Studios. Steve Jobs had purchased Pixar in 1986, but the company had yet to find its niche. When its 1988 short film Tin Toy won an Oscar, Disney took notice, and the two companies soon formed a partnership that would prove to be extremely successful, beginning with the release of Toy Story. What popular toy was cut from the original plot? Discuss

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Hanno the Navigator

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Hanno was a Carthaginian explorer who, in the 5th century BCE, led about 60 ships to explore and colonize the northwestern coast of Africa. Attempts to identify the places mentioned in early accounts of the voyage have failed, possibly because the Carthaginians altered details to discourage competitors. Still, it is believed that Hanno traveled at least as far as Senegal, and possibly as far as Cameroon or Gabon. At the end of the journey, Hanno reported finding an island populated with what? Discuss

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