World Trade Center Opens in New York City (1973)

With seven buildings and a shopping concourse, the World Trade Center in lower Manhattan was the largest commercial complex in the world before it was destroyed in the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Its most prominent structures were the 110-story rectangular Twin Towers, which, at more than 1,360 ft (415 m) tall, were the tallest…

Great Falls Ski Club Mannequin Jump

In the zany sport of mannequin jumping, contestants build a mannequin—which could represent anything from SpongeBob SquarePants to a Ninja Turtle—and send it flying off a 15-foot ski jump. Hundreds of spectators come to watch the mannequins fly—and often self-destruct on the way down. The Great Falls Ski Club Mannequin Jump is held on the…

McKinley Morganfield, AKA Muddy Waters (1913)

As a teenager in Mississippi, Waters played traditional country blues, but after settling in Chicago in the 1940s, he switched to a more urban style with amplified instruments. He soon became known for his driving slide guitar technique and darkly expressive vocal style. From the 1950s on, Waters recorded, toured, and played various music festivals.…

Titian

Born around 1490, Titian was a leading Venetian Renaissance painter whose technique, particularly his brushwork, composition, and use of color, influenced generations of artists after him. He is known for his psychologically penetrating portraits as well as his depictions of religious and mythological scenes. What politician’s staff member once altered Titian’s Wikipedia page in a…

glasnost | Soviet government policy | Britannica.com

The Russian word glasnost, translated as “openness,” refers to the Soviet policy of open discussion of political and social issues. The policy was instituted by Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev in the late 1980s and began the democratization of the Soviet Union. Source: glasnost | Soviet government policy | Britannica.com

April 4, 2020 – NATIONAL VITAMIN C DAY – NATIONAL SCHOOL LIBRARIAN DAY – NATIONAL HANDMADE DAY – NATIONAL LOVE OUR CHILDREN DAY – NATIONAL WALK AROUND THINGS DAY – NATIONAL EDUCATION AND SHARING DAY – JEEP 4X4 DAY – NATIONAL HUG A NEWSPERSON DAY – NATIONAL CHICKEN CORDON BLEU DAY

The post April 4, 2020 – NATIONAL VITAMIN C DAY – NATIONAL SCHOOL LIBRARIAN DAY – NATIONAL HANDMADE DAY – NATIONAL LOVE OUR CHILDREN DAY – NATIONAL WALK AROUND THINGS DAY – NATIONAL EDUCATION AND SHARING DAY – JEEP 4X4 DAY – NATIONAL HUG A NEWSPERSON DAY – NATIONAL CHICKEN CORDON BLEU DAY appeared first…

The Interpretation of Dreams

Dr. Sigmund Freud introduced his authoritative theory on why people dream and the true meaning of these dreams in his 1899 book The Interpretation of Dreams. In Freud’s view, all dreams are a form of wish fulfillment. They are the expression of desires that are ordinarily repressed—meaning hidden from consciousness—because they represent forbidden impulses. Even…

Henry Robinson Luce (1898)

One of the most powerful—and controversial—figures in the history of US journalism, Luce founded Time magazine in 1923 with former Yale classmate Briton Hadden. It was the first news-weekly in the US and is now the largest. Luce went on to launch a number of other highly successful magazines, including Fortune, Life, and Sports Illustrated.…

Oscar Wilde’s Libel Case Begins (1895)

When the marquess of Queensbury became convinced that his son, Alfred Douglas, was having an affair with Wilde, he began to rail against the author and playwright, publicly accusing Wilde of sodomy, a crime at the time. At Douglas’s urging, Wilde sued the marquess for libel. He not only lost the case, but was in…

Royal Easter Show

The largest and best-attended of the Australian agricultural fairs, the Royal Easter Show was first held in 1822 as a way of promoting the country’s agricultural industry and helping people sell their products. Now it attracts more than a million visitors each year and has expanded to include sports competitions, fashion and flower shows, and…

“littered with malaprops” – Malapropism

mal·a·prop·ism n. Ludicrous misuse of a word, especially by confusion with one of similar sound.   A confused use of words in which an appropriate word is replaced by one with similar sound but ludicrously inappropriate meaning. The Free Dictionary – Malapropism

The post “littered with malaprops” – Malapropism appeared first on Here’s the Old Catch Phrase Daily.

April 3, 2020 – NATIONAL FIND A RAINBOW DAY – NATIONAL FILM SCORE DAY – WORLD PARTY DAY – NATIONAL TWEED DAY – NATIONAL CHOCOLATE MOUSSE DAY

The post April 3, 2020 – NATIONAL FIND A RAINBOW DAY – NATIONAL FILM SCORE DAY – WORLD PARTY DAY – NATIONAL TWEED DAY – NATIONAL CHOCOLATE MOUSSE DAY appeared first on National Day Calendar. Read More Source: National Day Calendar

MEDIA ALERT | NEW DAY PROCLAMATION | NATIONAL CRAWFISH DAY – April 17

NATIONAL CRAWFISH DAY National Crawfish Day on April 17th celebrates one of the South’s most iconic foods. Each year the mudbug brings out not only a desire for newspaper-covered picnic tables but a language all on its own. A smaller, fresh-water cousin to the lobster, crawfish provide a unique flavor to many homegrown Southern dishes.…

As the World Turns Premieres (1956)

Soap operas began in the early 1930s as 15-minute radio episodes and continued in that format when they began appearing on TV in the early 1950s. As the World Turns premiered as the first half-hour TV soap. The show, which primarily focused on two professional families in the fictional town of Oakdale, Illinois, ran for…

Ardashir I

Ardashir I was the founder of the last pre-Islamic Persian dynasty, the Sassanid dynasty, which began in 224 CE and ended with the Arab conquest in 651. At its peak, the Sassanid Empire stretched from the Arabian peninsula to India. Ardashir established Zoroastrianism as the state religion and strengthened it by collecting sacred texts and…

Pascua Florida Day

Although no one knows for certain the date on which Ponce de León landed at Florida in 1513, it is widely believed that he first stepped ashore on April 2. He named the land Pascua Florida because it was Eastertime. Pascua is a Spanish word meaning “Easter,” and Florida means “flowering” or “full of flowers.”…

Émile François Zola (1840)

Zola was the founder of French naturalism, a literary school that maintained that novel-writing should be scientific, appraising reality in terms of natural forces such as heredity or environment. Inspired by his readings in sociology and medicine, he applied his theory in a vast series of novels in which the characters are impartially observed and…

“You can be ornery when you’re Scotty, but not when you’re Kirk.” – Paul Graham

“You can be ornery when you’re Scotty, but not when you’re Kirk.” – Paul Graham   While reading a long but very interesting article from 2013 by Paul Graham I found this jewel there. Talking about the ‘people handling’ style of engineers vs. sales people. Mostly differences in Customer Service orientation. I don’t think I’m…

Antonio Lucio Vivaldi (1678)

Vivaldi was an Italian composer, considered the greatest master of Italian baroque. He became a priest in 1703 and spent most of his life after 1709 in Venice, teaching and playing the violin and writing music for the Pietà, a music conservatory for orphaned girls. Although he produced vocal music, including 46 operas, Vivaldi is…

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